The purpose of prophecy is to…

…build the enduring faith and hope in the would-be believers necessary to get through the dark night of the End of the Age, which will then burst into the new dawn of a new work by God.

…point to the establishment of righteousness, judgment, and compassion in balance, which Jesus will do by reconciling the Old and New Covenants together, starting with a Remnant that will “keep the commandments of God and have the faith of Jesus,” etc, etc.

…establish courageous leadership, the innocence of integrity, diligent witness, and the grace of life in the would-be believers, which they are to uphold despite all of the obstacles the adversaries will throw at them.

…develop the disciplines of thought, service, desire, decision, and belief in the potential Christians necessary to get through the unholy days ahead.

…establish all glory, honor, power, wisdom, riches, blessing, and strength, with thanksgiving through Jesus Christ in those who overcome the trappings of the adversaries, and keep the faith, even unto death.

…prove the indwelling love of God in His holy ones and the love of the holy ones in God.

The “rapture” myth is completely anathema to the noble purposes of prophecy.

 
 
I once had someone tell me that I should leave the interpretation of prophecy
to the "experts."

 I replied with the question, "whose 'experts' would that be?

The proponents of Immanence (or, as I call it, Immediacy) who say that Jesus can still come back at any time, without warning? Or would that be the Classical Historicism advocated by the Latin (Western) writers? These would be hard to reconcile, since one advocated millennialism while the other advocated amillennialism.

 Of course, another argument that arose was between the Latin (Catholic) writers and the Greek (Orthodox) writers. While the Catholic theologians advocated an interpretive approach to prophecy, The Orthodox writers advocated a non-interpretive Realized Eschatology that said prophecy couldn't be interpreted
in the first place, and would only be understood after the fact. This (and many other things) would lead to the Great East-West Schism of 1050 AD. Obviously, there seems to be a difference between these two groups of "experts."

Would these "experts" be from Protestant Historicism? It was just like the Classical Historical approach advocated by the Catholics, except that they identified the Catholics as the "Whore of Babylon," and the Pope as the "beast. Of course, the Catholic "experts" immediately fire back. Certain Jesuits even forwarded the eschatologies of Futurism or Preterism. Seems like an awful lot of "experts" were saying completely different things.

The 17th Century saw an explosion of new "experts,' all teaching their own interpretations of prophecy, and arriving at even more bizarre eschatologies and theologies. Of course, there is the biggie that arose when Darby, Scofield, Anderson, McDonald, and the Dispensationalists of the Plymouth Brethren introduced us to the concept of the "rapture" (though no one else had ever heard of such a thing)? And they even came up with three different flavors-- pre-, mid-, and post-tribulationalism.Then again, there was Joseph Smith and the Mormons with their "True Church," which was--of course--supported by their own interpretations of prophecy. There were also the "experts" Swedenborg, Fairbairn, and the allegorical-only Idealists who advocated their own "true interpretation" of prophecy. There was also the "experts" Smith and White who began the Adventists cult movement by fusing elements of Protestant Historicism, Dispensationalism, and Idealism, all of which revealed that they were the "True Church.".  Of course, there was Russel and the Jehovah's Witnesses, there to tell us via prophecy that they were the only "true Church." There sure were a lot of "experts" telling us that theirs was the "True Church" according to their interpretations.

Since then, we've had a whole slew of new "experts" arise to tell how prophecy works, including Armstrong and his "British Israelism," various "gurus" mingling Christian teachings with Eastern Mysticism, the Reconstructionists who tell us that religion is "evolutionary" and continuously created, C.H. Cobb and
his own brand of "Realized Eschatology" in which Jesus was not the fulfillment of prophecy, but deliberately fulfilled prophecy by reading the Old Testament as it were a play book for the New Orleans Saints. Which of these "experts" should we read and heed?

If there is one thing that is totally messed up, it's that 1/3rd of the Bible known as prophecy, and they way all of the different "experts" have been handling it.

Forunately, I've found the methodology that cuts through all of the distortions and noise, and it comes straight from the mouth of Jesus and His prophets--Triunism.

Triunism takes into account all historical facts and figures, and it doesn't require one to skip over a single segment of history or leave out a single bibical personality to work (as is typicaly of all the other schools of
prophetic interpretation). Triunism takes into account all biblical statements, in every timeframe, and in every mode of interpretation.

Seem like a bold statement?

Maybe. But if you take a gander at my hypothesis, you may quickly find yourself realizing that it's the only thing that makes sense of everything in scripture and history, and why there were so many different kinds of "experts" throughout the history of the churches.

And guess what?

I'm not interested in starting my own "True Church;" I'm just trying to inform and straighten out the ones we already have!

Ike

http://thetriunist.weebly.com/index.html
http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/pages/The-Triune-Hypothesis/102657386473773
 
 
"The Triune Hypothesis" by H.E. Eickleberry, Jr. is now available for the Nook reader via Barnes & Noble at

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Triune-Hypothesis/HE-Eickleberry-Jr/e/2940012363503/?itm=2&USRI=eickleberry

Based on an examination of how (not just what) Jesus and the prophets prophesied, The Triune Hypothesis is a guide to reading the Bible prophetically in all three dimensions of interpretation-the horizontal axis in time (what was, is, and/or is to come), the perpendicular axis in application (literal, figurative, and/or spiritual), and the vertical axis in context (thesis, generality, and/or antithesis).

Topics of discussion include the resurrections, the triune "Last Days," the Pentecosts, the one-baptism-in-three-parts, the triple application of the Elijah prophecies, the Temples in Jerusalem, the Abominations of Desolation, the Triune Israel, the devolution of prophecy, and much more.

 
 
Historicism, Dispensationalism, and certain forms of Reconstructionist Christian eschatology all depend on the concept that that there are only seven years (one "week" of years) of prophetic events to be fulfilled in the End of the Age.

But does this notion bear up under closer scrutiny?

There are seven Old Testament prophecies that speak of prophetic events in terms of seventy years, not seven. More important, John used every single one of these Old Testament seventy-year prophecies in Revelation:

John used Isaiah's "ships of Tarshish" seventy-year prophecy [chapter 23] in the second half of Revelation 18.

John used Jeremiah's "silencing Babylon" seventy-year prophecy [chapter 25] for the conclusion of Revelation 18.

John used Jeremiah's "fall of Babylon" and restoration of Israel seventy-year prophecy [chapter 29] for the first half of Revelation 18.

John used Zechariah's "four horses" seventy-year prophecy [chapter 1] in antithesis, along with his "four horns" prophecy from the same chapter, for the "four horses" prophecy in Revelation 5. (He also used Zechariah's "measuring rod" prophecy [chapter 2] in Revelation 11.)

John used Zechariah's "Great Mountain" seventy-year prophecy [chapter 7] at the beginning of the conclusion of Revelation, starting in chapter 21.

John used the "day of the Lord" = 1,000 years" concept from Psalm 90 in Revelation chapter 20. This prophecy also asks the question, "How long, O, Lord," and the answer is already given in the same Psalm--seventy, or, if by reason of vain struggle, eighty years.

Daniel's timing prophecy [chapter 9] is the structural basis for John's entire chronological scroll in Revelation, which is itself derived from Jesus three-part Olivet Discourse.

Now, some might argue that these prophecies were fulfilled in history...and they would be partly right; but if they were only fulfilled in history, why did John go out of his way to make sure that all seven of these Old Testament seventy-year prophecies made their way into Revelation?

Answer: The End of the Age won't be seven years; it'll be seventy years, just like seven...make that eight...prophets said.

These things being the case, where did the "experts" get the notion that the End of the Age would only be seven years by themselves?

Answer: They made it up to try and connect Jesus back to the prophecies of Daniel when Daniel was already fulfilled once in the events from the destruction of the First Temple of Jerusalem until the end of the Maccabean Revolt; the events involving Jesus' First Advent were a second iteration of all these prophecies (but in a different context and application of those prophecies than the previous one), and not part of the first iteration.

Sorry, but all the other schools of biblical interpretation got things wrong; the proper way to read prophecy is the way Jesus gave and interpreted prophecy--triunely!

For more information, see the links below.

Ike

********
 
Which of the following is the correct way to read Bible prophecy?
 
A. Immediacy
B. Historicism
C. Dispensationalism
D. Preterism (Full or Partial)
E. Idealism
F. Realized/Sapiential Eschatology
G. All of the above
H. None of the above
 

Based on an examination of how (not just what) Jesus and the prophets prophesied, "The Triune Hypothesis" is a guide to reading the Bible prophetically in all three dimensions of interpretation-the horizontal axis in time (what was, is, and/or is to come), the perpendicular axis in application (literal, figurative, and/or spiritual), and the vertical axis in context (thesis, generality, and/or antithesis).
 
Topics of discussion include the resurrections, the triune "Last Days," the Pentecosts, the one-baptism-in-three-parts, the triple application of the Elijah prophecies, the Temples in Jerusalem, the Abominations of Desolation, the Triune Israel, the devolution of prophecy, and much more.
 
Kindle Version:
 
http://www.amazon.com/The-Triune-Hypothesis-ebook/dp/B0049P231G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&s=books&qid=1289971036&sr=1-1
 
Print Version:
 
http://www.amazon.com/Triune-Hypothesis-Mr-Eickleberry-Jr/dp/1456322087/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1290113159&sr=8-3
 
Facebook: (discussions enabled)
 
http://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/pages/The-Triune-Hypothesis/102657386473773
 
Web: (filtered blog comments enabled)
 
http://thetriunist.weebly.com/index.html

 
Memoriam 01/04/2011
 
 
 
A new book about a new, all-encompassing approach to reading Bible prophecy based on an examination of what Jesus and the prophets actually said and how they actually said it.

About the book

Which of the following is the correct way to read Bible prophecy?

A. Immediacy
B. Historicism
C. Dispensationalism
D. Preterism (Full or Partial)
E. Idealism
F. Realized/Sapiential Eschatology
G. All of the above
H. None of the above

Find out in The Triune Hypothesis.

Based on examination of how (not just what) Jesus and the prophets prophesied, The Triune Hypothesis is a guide to reading the Bible prophetically in all three dimensions of interpretation-the horizontal axis in time (what was, is, and/or is to come), the perpendicular axis in application (literal, figurative, and/or spiritual), and the vertical axis in context (thesis, generality, and/or antithesis).

Topics of Discussion

—“An” end versus “the” end in the prophecies of Ezekiel

—Jesus’ discussion of the three resurrections

—Deficiency (Haser), excessiveness (Shalem), and perfection (Qesidrah) in prophetic fulfillments

—The Millennium

—The triune concept of the “Last Days”

—The three Pentecosts

—The triune Baptism

—The lost Gospel

—“Earth” versus earth

—Prophetic procedure

—Jesus’ triune interpretation of the prophecy of Elijah

—Jesus on the “scattering of the sheep” prophecy

—Jesus prophecy against the three Temples of Jerusalem

—The Abominations of Desolation

—The three “Sons of Perdition”

—The split Sanhedrin/Olivet Discourse

—The Triune Israel

—Thesis versus antithesis

—Perfect prophetic tense

—The devolution of prophetic interpretation

Available exclusively at Amazon.com.
 
 
Triunism is a complete approach to reading Bible prophecy along all three axes of interpretation--horizontally, vertically, and perpendicularly.

Along the horizontal axis, any given prophecy typically has an application in ancient history of Israel, and application in the intermediate history of Christianity, and an application in the end of the age.

Along the perpendicular axis, one can interpret any given prophecy literally, figuratively, and/or spiritually, as dictated by the historical context which the reader is taking into consideration.

Along the vertical axis, any given symbol, phrase, passage, or concept can apply generally to all persons within a given group, thetically as it applies to the proponents of God, and/or antithetically as it applies to the opponents of God.

Whereas all the previous schools of prophetic interpretation parsed prophecies singularly, leading to errors and failures, Triunism endeavors to take all historical and biblical facts into account, but as three distinct and complete iterations in time.

Case in point

Illustrating the concept, a Triunist would read the Prophecies of Daniel in three distinct contexts.

The first iteration of Daniel was from the destruction of the First Temple of Jerusalem in 587 BC (actually, from the time Jeremiah finished declaring the decree of God in 580 BC) to the End of the Maccabean Revolt in 160 BC. (The last "week" of Daniel's prophecies.) In this iteration, the figures were realized primarily literally with figurative elements, with Antiochus IV Ephiphanes representing “antichrist,” the traitorous priest Jason (with whom Antiochus "confirmed" his earlier covenant) representing “false prophet,” and Judas Maccabeus representing the real “Christ.”

The second iteration of Daniel was from the time the Roman General Pompey occupied Judea and defiled the Second Temple of Jerusalem in 63 BC until the end of the Simon bar Koseba Revolt in 164 AD. This iteration marked a complete reversal of the previous sequence, with the Jews winding up right back where they started—exiled, and without a temple. The fulfillment of Daniel’s figures in this iteration were primarily spiritual (in the teachings of Jesus Christ) with literal elements (like the crucifixion).

The third iteration will be the End of the Age, which will be 70 years long (God’s fine print not withstanding) divided into three parts (but reordered), as Jesus outlined in the Olivet Discourse, and John documented in his chronological three-part scroll in Revelation. This iteration will be a combination of the literalism of the first iteration (a squared) and the spiritualism of the second iteration (b squared) put together (c squared). This makes prophecy the first and best predictor of the future, with no speculation or contrivance required.

The Premise

The Triunist believes that the fundamental purpose of prophecy has always been, is now, and forever shall be to exhort the potential believers to acquire, grow, and finish in the Gospel of Jesus Christ, no matter the cost, in the tradition of the martyrs of old, despite the ever-increasing attacks on the Faith coming from both inside and outside the Churches.

John 16:33

These things I have spoken unto you, that in Me you might have peace. In the world you shall have tribulation, but be of good cheer: I have overcome the world.